“Two (Or Three or Four) Trains Running” on Sleuthsayers

“Back when I started reading grown-up mysteries like Ed McBain and Rex Stout, their books weren’t much longer than the Hardy Boys books I’d recently left behind. If I pick up one of those books now, they feel very linear. We go from point A to point B, C, D and so on and eventually we can predict the next bead on the string. Maybe that’s why some of the heroes of mystery who started in pulp could churn them out so quickly. Even if they offered surprises along the way, they built the stories on one logical progression.

Today’s stories, especially bestsellers and blockbuster thrillers, are much longer, and new writers often complain to me that they can’t come up with enough events to go on that long.

Use subplots.”

Steve talks about the importance of subplots on the Sleuthsayers blog.